Swamper Links
Swamper Videos
Loading...

Can the material used for aircraft tires be used for regular car tires?

aircraft tires can carry heavy loads at a tremendous rate, unlike regular car tires. . . . so it is possible that the material used for aircraft tires is molded on a tire size of a normal car and be used effectively for the brakes and jump over cars high altitude?

6 Responses to “Can the material used for aircraft tires be used for regular car tires?”

  • rockfish:

    it can but not affordable. car racing tires would be a more affordable choice.

  • Will:

    they already have tires designed for that why reinvent the wheel?

  • Mxsmanic:

    It’s possible, but not desirable. Cars and airplanes have dramatically different requirements for their tires, so there isn’t necessarily any advantage to using the materials in airplane tires in automobile tires. Things like hydroplaning and fire/explosion resistance are vitally important in airplane tires, but they are much less so in automobile tires, for which things like traction are predominant issues.

    Airplane tires are manufactured and designed to higher standards, too, so making car tires the same way would substantially raise their prices.

  • Ben Dere Dun Dat:

    The materials are in fact pretty much the same, but it is the design that is different. As others have explained, airplane tires would not work well on autos and they would be much more expensive than what you can buy now. I fly a plane with tires approximately the same size as a standard car tire and they cost over $600 apiece.

    There are other problems. For one, aircraft tires are made to go at high speed for very short distances. You would not get very high mileage out of a car tire if it were designed like an airplane tire. For another thing, aircraft tires are not designed for the loads imposed when going around curves at high speed like auto tires are.

    Auto tires are engineered and constructed very well and the quality has improved dramatically over the years. In the 1970′s, top-of-the-line Michelin tires were good for 40,000 miles with a top speed rating of 100mph and they cost about $100 each. Today, the best passenger tires can go 80,000 miles at speeds up to 130mph…and they cost about $150 each. Adjusting for inflation, they are cheaper today than 30 years ago, and they are far better tires.

  • rohak1212:

    They are already basically the same materials. The difference is just what they’re built to do. Your average car tire does not need to be able to support that kind of weight or impact, so it’s just not built that strong.

  • DT3238:

    They are the same as car tires- they just have more reinforcement material in them to tolerate the very high inflation pressures (over 200psi, about 6 times the pressure of a car); high rotation speeds (up to 250 mph/400 km/h) and high brake temperatures (which lead to use of nitrogen instead of air for pressurization.

    The shock absorption is from the landing gear oleo strut (oil filled cylinder), not the tire- so for jumping cars you would need landing gear.

    Bear in mind that jetliners land only on nice smooth runways. Car tires built like aircraft tires would be smaller and narrower (higher pressure) which would be great for fuel economy but noisy and harsh riding (kind of like racing bike vs mountain bike tires).

Leave a Reply

hogan outlet hogan outlet online louboutin pas cher louboutin pas cher tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher air max pas cher air max pas cher air max pas cher air max pas cher air max pas cher air max pas cher golden goose outlet golden goose outlet golden goose outlet golden goose outlet golden goose outlet golden goose outlet